Looking For a New Hashtag?

I’ve always said the new year doesn’t begin on January 1. It begins when teachers come back to school. It’s the best time of year to start something new, as you are getting used to a new schedule, a new building, a new position.

For educators, summer is a time of renewal. It can also be an opportunity to try something new in preparation for turning over a new leaf come fall. If you are looking for some direction, look to your personal learning network. If you don’t have one, now is a good time to begin establishing one. A personal learning network should inspire and support you.

Don’t know where to start? Try Twitter or Instagram. Here are some hashtags to get you started:

#teaching – Whether on Twitter or Instagram, this time of year the posts are heavy in pictures. With summer upon most of us, the posts are inspirational in that they celebrate the end to the year, promote wellness, or feature lessons learning during summer professional learning workshops.

#instructionaldesign – Much more activity on Twitter – Much of the focus is on student engagement, one of the well-deserved buzzwords going around right now.

#teacherlife – I LOVE this hashtag. On Instagram right now, teachers are posting pictures of their summer selves, or pictures of concepts they are excited to try next year. On Twitter, the posts are entertaining to say the least!

The hashtags (and the possibilities) are endless. Search one. Search many! Just be sure to share what you learn with others!

 

Advertisements

#ObserveMe

In true form of most of my ideas, I am stealing another from a colleague of mine. This past weekend, she posted a picture of a sign she had placed on her door. It read like this:

#ObserveMe

I’d love formative feedback on three of my professional goals:

  • Do I keep student learning at the forefront of conversations?
  • Do I value staff and student opinions by actually listening?
  • Do my actions create a collaborative culture?

The sign also included a link to an observation tool individuals could use to provide feedback.

Upending some research, the idea comes from Robert Kaplinsky and he got the idea from a Tweet he came across.

To say the least, I AM ABSOLUTELY IN LOVE WITH THIS IDEA, AND WILL BE USING IT IMMEDIATELY! I’ve always found it very interesting we as administrators are so focused on giving feedback that we often forget to seek out feedback for our own growth. Consider a building principal who gets the majority of feedback from a superior who they see on a very infrequent basis.

If you want to participate, visit Kaplinsky’s website (Link Above) and post a sign outside your door. It’s an easy way to gain peer feedback and reflect on your practice!